Donald Trump's ban from Facebook and Instagram

Donald Trump's ban from Facebook and Instagram was upheld by Facebook's Oversight Board. But it criticised the permanent nature of the ban as beyond the scope of Facebook's normal penalties. It has ordered Facebook to review the decision and "justify a proportionate response" that is applied to everyone, including ordinary users. The former president was banned from both sites in January following the Capitol Hill riots.

The Oversight Board said the initial decision to permanently suspend Mr Trump was "indeterminate and standardless", and that the correct response should be "consistent with the rules that are applied to other users of its platform". Facebook must respond within six months, it said. At a press conference, co-chair Helle Thorning-Schmidt admitted: "We did not have an easy answer." She added that she felt Facebook would "appreciate the decision". In response, Facebook said it would "consider the board's decision and determine an action that is clear and proportionate".

 

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu failed to meet a deadline to put together a new governing coalition, raising the possibility that his Likud party could be pushed into the opposition for the first time in 12 years. The deadline closed a four-week window granted to Netanyahu by Israel’s figurehead president. The matter now bounces back to President Reuven Rivlin, who announced just after midnight that he would contact on Wednesday the 13 parties with seats in parliament to discuss “the continuation of the process of forming a government.”

Rivlin is expected in the coming days to give one of Netanyahu’s opponents a chance to form an alternative coalition government. He also could ask the parliament to select one of its own members as prime minister. If all else fails, the country would be forced into another election this fall — the fifth in just over two years.

 

The entire Indian delegation in the UK for G7 talks was forced to self-isolate after two Covid cases were detected. India's Foreign Minister Subrahmanyam Jaishankar pulled out of face-to-face talks, saying he was "aware of exposure to possible Covid positive cases". He met British Home Secretary Priti Patel in person on Tuesday but joined the rest of the meetings virtually.

India is not in the G7 group of nations but delegates from the country were invited as guests. The two cases were picked up by tests in advance and none of the party had attended the meeting venue, the Press Association said. Mr Jaishankar has not tested positive. India is currently on the UK's red list meaning travel from there is banned, but some jobs are exempt including representatives of a foreign country. The official summit of G7 leaders is taking place in Cornwall next month, but ministers are currently in the UK for talks.

 

The death toll from the collapse of an overpass on the Mexico City metro rose to 24 Tuesday as crews untangled train carriages from the steel and concrete wreckage that fell onto a roadway. Monday (May 3) night’s accident was one of the deadliest in the history of the subway, and questions quickly arose about the structural integrity of the mass transit system, among the world’s busiest.

Another 27 people remained hospitalized of the more than 70 injured when the support beams collapsed about 10:30 p.m. as a train passed along the elevated section, Mayor Claudia Sheinbaum said. On Tuesday, a crane carefully lowered a train car containing four bodies to the ground. Of the 24 killed, 21 died at the scene, while the others died at hospitals. Children were among the fatalities, Sheinbaum said. Initial analysis pointed to a “presumed structural failure,” Sheinbaum said, promising a thorough and independent inquiry.

  • World this week

Leave a Comment